Beyond its capacity to produce spectacular images and video, a DSLR camera’s capacity to record high-quality audio is one of its key advantages. The camera’s built-in monaural microphone has generally disappointed professional and amateur filmmakers, vloggers, and content producers. I prefer to have the option of using an external stereo microphone to capture clear, sharp sound.

Most people are unaware that a USB microphone, like the Blue Yeti, can also be attached to a DSLR camera, such the Canon EOS Rebel SL3. External USB microphones are intended to be connected to computers via USB.

You must adhere to these instructions if you want to connect your USB microphone to a DSLR camera. First, check to see if your DSLR camera has a 3.5mm mic input and your USB microphone has a 3.5mm headphone output. Next, you’ll need a computer, a 3.5mm male-to-male stereo audio cable, and the USB cable that was included with your microphone.

How to Connect a USB Microphone to a DSLR

You need to connect the audio cables and power the microphone now that your hardware is assembled.

  1. Join the microphone’s 3.5mm headphone output to one end of the 3.5mm male-to-male audio cable.
  2. Connect the other end of the 3.5mm male-to-male audio cable to the 3.5mm microphone jack on your camera.
  3. Use the USB cord that came with your microphone to connect it to a computer to power it.

The Best Ways to Avoid Digital Distortion

All of the components of a conventional microphone are included in a USB microphone. However, it varies in that it has an integrated preamplifier and an analog-to-digital converter that enables audio to be recognized by the recording software on a computer. The microphone’s integrated preamp can emit a very high signal and result in digital distortion in your recording as we are bypassing the computer as the recording device. We have to change the audio levels in the camera to stop that from happening.

  1. On your camera, select Menu from the menu. As you would have suspected, this is where you can alter many camera settings, however some might not be available if your camera is in auto mode.
  2. Choose “Sound Recording” from the menu on the screen. You can choose between Auto, Manual, and Disabled sound recording modes using this. Put the Sound recording in “Manual” mode instead of “Auto.”

Automatic Gain Control (AGC), which can automatically boost the audio volume and cause a lot of buzzing and interference in your recordings, can occur if the camera is left on Auto.

How to Set the Levels for Your Recording

Poor sound can arise from recording audio in your camera at the wrong volume levels. The Recording Levels can be adjusted as shown here.

  1. Click on “Rec. level.”
  2. Depending on how close the subject is to the camera, drag the slider all the way to the left using the D-pad or touch screen. To save, click “Set.”

We can now adjust the volume level or gain on your actual microphone. Hold the microphone in your hand.

  1. Speak into the camera while keeping an eye on the left and right audio levels in decibels (dB).
  2. Your microphone’s gain control is readily accessible.

The sound should ideally peak right below the green bar, in the -12 range. You can use a DSLR camera and your external USB microphone to record latency-free audio after completing that step.

Is Every USB Microphone the Same?

You need to decide how you’ll utilize the USB microphone before you choose one. Not every USB microphone is the same. Others are better suited for podcasting or music recording, while some are made specifically for live streaming video games.

The three most frequent applications for a USB microphone are:

  1. Gameplay and live streaming
  2. Podcasting
  3. Recording music

USB microphones come with a variety of features and customization choices. For instance, the Blue Yeti USB Microphone offers a variety of polar patterns (cardioid, stereo, omnidirectional, bidirectional).

How to Connect a USB Microphone to a DSLR

You need to connect the audio cables and power the microphone now that your hardware is assembled.

  1. Join the microphone’s 3.5mm headphone output to one end of the 3.5mm male-to-male audio cable.
  2. Connect the other end of the 3.5mm male-to-male audio cable to the 3.5mm microphone jack on your camera.
  3. Use the USB cord that came with your microphone to connect it to a computer to power it.

The Best Ways to Avoid Digital Distortion

All of the components of a conventional microphone are included in a USB microphone. However, it varies in that it has an integrated preamplifier and an analog-to-digital converter that enables audio to be recognized by the recording software on a computer. The microphone’s integrated preamp can emit a very high signal and result in digital distortion in your recording as we are bypassing the computer as the recording device. We have to change the audio levels in the camera to stop that from happening.

  1. On your camera, select Menu from the menu. As you would have suspected, this is where you can alter many camera settings, however some might not be available if your camera is in auto mode.
  2. Choose “Sound Recording” from the menu on the screen. You can choose between Auto, Manual, and Disabled sound recording modes using this. Put the Sound recording in “Manual” mode instead of “Auto.”

Automatic Gain Control (AGC), which can automatically boost the audio volume and cause a lot of buzzing and interference in your recordings, can occur if the camera is left on Auto.

How to Set the Levels for Your Recording

Poor sound can arise from recording audio in your camera at the wrong volume levels. The Recording Levels can be adjusted as shown here.

  1. Click on “Rec. level.”
  2. Depending on how close the subject is to the camera, drag the slider all the way to the left using the D-pad or touch screen. To save, click “Set.”

We can now adjust the volume level or gain on your actual microphone. Hold the microphone in your hand.

  1. Speak into the camera while keeping an eye on the left and right audio levels in decibels (dB).
  2. Your microphone’s gain control is readily accessible.

The sound should ideally peak right below the green bar, in the -12 range. You can use a DSLR camera and your external USB microphone to record latency-free audio after completing that step.

Is Every USB Microphone the Same?

You need to decide how you’ll utilize the USB microphone before you choose one. Not every USB microphone is the same. Others are better suited for podcasting or music recording, while some are made specifically for live streaming video games.

The three most frequent applications for USB microphones

  1. Gameplay and live streaming
  2. Podcasting
  3. Recording music

USB microphones come with a variety of features and customization choices. For instance, the Blue Yeti USB Microphone offers a variety of polar patterns (cardioid, stereo, omnidirectional, bidirectional).

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